May 17, 2017 Day118 of the First Year - History

May 17, 2017 Day118 of the First Year - History


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May 17, 2017 Day 118 of the First Year

9:00AM THE PRESIDENT departs the White House en route to Joint Base Andrews

South Lawn

9:20AM THE PRESIDENT departs Washington, D.C. en route to Groton, Connecticut

Joint Base Andrews

10:25AM THE PRESIDENT arrives in Groton, Connecticut

Groton-New London Airport

Pre-Credentialed Media

11:05AM THE PRESIDENT gives remarks at the United States Coast Guard Academy Commencement Ceremony

United States Coast Guard Academy

1:55PM THE PRESIDENT departs Groton, Connecticut en route to Washington, D.C.

Groton-New London Airport

3:30PM THE PRESIDENT arrives at the White House

South Lawn


May 17, 2017 Day118 of the First Year - History

Tens of thousands of years ago, during the Ice Age, a new creature appeared on Earth: the dog. How did this happen? And how has the relationship between humans and dogs changed over the years? Two fascinating articles tell an incredible story that connects to science, history—and of course, lots of adorable doggies.

As you read these articles, look for how dogs, and their relationships with humans, have changed over time.

How the Wolf Became the Dog

Life was tough for humans during the Ice Age. A new kind of friend made things better.

Be happy you didn’t live on Earth 35,000 years ago.

That was a time known as the Ice Age. Large sheets of ice covered much of Europe, Asia, and the Americas. There were no nations yet, no cities or towns. For many of our early human ancestors, life was a daily struggle for survival. They lived in caves or huts made of animal bones. They hunted reindeer with sharpened stones and sticks. Danger lurked everywhere—diseases with no cures, saber-toothed tigers with 11-inch fangs, elephant-like mastodons with swordlike tusks.

But it was during this harsh time that something beautiful was born: the friendship between humans and dogs.

Be glad you didn’t live on Earth 35,000 years ago.

That was a time known as the Ice Age. Large sheets of ice covered much of Europe, Asia, and the Americas. There were no nations yet, no cities or towns. Many of our early human ancestors struggled to survive. They lived in caves or huts made of animal bones. They hunted reindeer with sharpened stones and sticks. Danger was everywhere. There were diseases with no cures. There were sabertoothed tigers with 11-inch fangs. There were elephant-like mastodons with long, sharp tusks.

But during this harsh time, something beautiful was born: the friendship between humans and dogs.

Granger, NYC/The Granger Collection

Beloved ancient Egyptian hunting dogs were often turned into mummies.

Dogs have been guarding us, working with us, and snuggling with us for thousands of years. But scientists are only now starting to understand the long history of dogs. There
are many mysteries. One thing is certain though: Every dog has the same ancestor, the gray wolf.

This does not mean that a fierce wolf suddenly and magically morphed into a yapping Chihuahua with a pink bow. The change occurred gradually, over thousands of years. Scientists speculate that the first dog appeared between 15,000 and 38,000 years ago.

At that time, many animals—including the wolf—posed a threat to humans. But at some point, a group of humans and a group of wolves teamed up. How did this happen?

One theory: A few wolves crept into human campsites, lured by tasty food scraps. These wolves were less aggressive than other wolves. But they still helped protect humans from dangerous predators. And so humans let these wolves stick around. The gentler wolves, their bellies full of human food, lived longer than other wolves. They gave birth to even gentler babies, which grew up to have gentle babies of their own. On and on this went, until a new, calmer breed of wolf emerged.

Dogs have been living with humans for thousands of years. But scientists are only now starting to understand the history of dogs. There are many mysteries. But one thing is certain: All dogs have the same ancestor, the gray wolf.

This does not mean that a fierce wolf suddenly morphed into a yapping Chihuahua with a pink bow. The change happened slowly. It took thousands of years. Experts speculate that the first dog appeared between 15,000 and 38,000 years ago.

At that time, many animals posed a threat to humans. Wolves were among them. But at some point, a group of humans and a group of wolves teamed up. How did this happen?

One theory: A few wolves crept into human campsites to eat food scraps. They were less aggressive than other wolves. But they still helped protect humans from other animals. And so the humans let them stay. The gentler wolves ate human food. This helped them live longer than other wolves. They gave birth to even gentler babies, which grew up and had gentle babies too. After a while, there was a new, calmer breed of wolf.

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Sergeant Stubby was the most famous dog soldier of World War I.

As the centuries passed, the wolves living near humans continued to change. Their bodies got smaller, their ears floppier. They became friendlier and more eager to please humans. Soon, a new kind of creature had developed: the dog.

Dogs were the first domesticated animals—that is, animals bred and raised to live among us. Today, there are many kinds of domesticated animals—cows that give us milk, chickens that lay eggs, horses that we ride, and sheep that provide wool. But dogs were the first.

Eventually, humans put dogs to work in new ways. Dogs became trained hunters, fighters, and animal herders. Roman warriors marched into battle alongside enormous war dogs. In ancient Egypt, some hunting dogs were so prized that they were turned into mummies and buried with their owners.

Dogs helped in less ferocious ways too. Before people used forks, spoons, and napkins, they’d wipe their greasy hands on dogs that sat by their tables. On icy winter nights, people used dogs as foot warmers. Some European kings wouldn’t take a bite of food until their dog had tasted it first. Only then could they be sure the food hadn’t been poisoned.

Centuries went by. The wolves living near humans continued to change. They got smaller. Their ears got floppier. They became friendlier and more eager to please humans. Over time, a new kind of creature developed: the dog.

Dogs were the first domesticated animals—that is, animals bred and raised to live among us. Today, there are many kinds of domesticated animals. There are cows that give us milk, chickens that lay eggs, horses that we ride, and sheep that provide wool. But dogs were the first.

Humans began putting dogs to work in new ways. They trained dogs to hunt, fight, and herd animals. Roman warriors marched into battle alongside huge war dogs. In ancient Egypt, favorite hunting dogs were turned into mummies and buried with their owners.

Dogs helped in other ways too. Before people used forks, spoons, and napkins, they’d wipe their greasy hands on dogs. On cold nights, people used dogs as foot warmers. In Europe, some kings wouldn’t eat their food until their dog had tasted it first. That way, they could tell if the food had been poisoned.

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Balto became a hero for delivering medicine to sick children in Alaska.

In the Americas, dogs have been working alongside humans for thousands of years. Native peoples used dogs as guards and hunting companions. George Washington plotted Revolutionary War battles with his hunting dog Sweetlips by his side. In the early 1800s, explorers Lewis and Clark journeyed across America’s western wilderness with a big black dog named Seaman.

As the centuries have passed, the bond between dogs and people has gotten stronger and stronger. And it all began tens of thousands of years ago, with a family of wolves howling across a dangerous, frozen land.

In the Americas, dogs have been helping humans for many years. Native peoples used dogs as guards and hunting companions. George Washington planned Revolutionary War battles with his hunting dog Sweetlips by his side. In the early 1800s, explorers Lewis and Clark crossed America’s western wilderness with a big black dog named Seaman.

Over time, the bond between dogs and people has grown very strong. And it all began thousands of years ago, with a family of wolves howling across a dangerous, frozen land.

How America Went DOG Crazy

Today, dogs are more than pets. They’re members of the family.

Scout, a little brown dog, seems to be going crazy. He bounces up and down like a furry ball. His tiny pink tongue flaps from his mouth as he licks everyone
in sight.

“He’s just excited,” sighs 12-year-old Ruby. “He’s always excited.”

Since Scout’s arrival in Ruby’s home two years ago, the dog has been an endless source of ear-splitting yaps, slobbery licks, smelly indoor puddles, and brown stains on the rug.

Nobody in Ruby’s family ever imagined that they would own such a spoiled, badly behaved little beast. Nor did the family imagine that they could love an animal as much as they love Scout.

“He’s so annoying,” Ruby moans. But then she snatches up the little dog and kisses his slimy black nose.

You can practically see Ruby’s heart melting with love.

Scout, a little brown dog, seems to be going crazy. He bounces up and down like a furry ball. His tongue flaps from his mouth as he licks everyone in sight.

“He’s just excited,” sighs 12-year-old Ruby. “He’s always excited.”

Scout lives with Ruby’s family. He yaps loudly. He slobbers. He leaves puddles on the floor. He stains the rug.

No one in Ruby’s home ever imagined that they would own such a spoiled, badly behaved little beast. Nor did they imagine that they could love an animal as much as they love Scout.

“He’s so annoying,” Ruby moans. But then she grabs Scout and kisses him.

You can almost see Ruby’s heart melting with love.

Granger, NYC/The Granger Collection

President Franklin D. Roosevelt was rarely seen without his terrier, Fala.

Today, nearly 50 percent of American families own at least one dog. Americans spend tens of billions of dollars on their dogs each year—on everything from veterinarian visits and grooming to gourmet treats and high-tech gadgets like doggy treadmills. A 2015 poll found that 38 percent of U.S. dog owners cook special meals for their dogs. It’s not surprising that 96 percent of owners consider their dogs to be members of the family.

Dogs have been by the sides of humans for tens of thousands of years. But until recently, dogs were mainly valued for the work they could do. They could chase foxes away from chicken coops and clear restaurant kitchens of rats. They could hunt for ducks and pull sleds over snowy hills. When fires broke out in cities, firehouse dogs cleared the way for fire wagons pulled by horses.

These hard-working dogs were too dirty and smelly to be allowed indoors. Dogs that became sick or injured either healed on their own or died most veterinarians provided care only for valuable animals, like horses and cows.

Today, nearly half of all American families own a dog. We spend tens of billions of dollars on our dogs each year. There are vet visits, grooming, gourmet treats, and more. A 2015 poll found that 38 percent of U.S. dog owners cook special meals for their dogs. It’s no surprise that 96 percent of owners think of their dogs as family members.

Dogs have been by the sides of humans for thousands of years. But until recently, dogs were mainly valued for the work they could do. They chased foxes away from chicken coops. They cleared restaurant kitchens of rats. They hunted for ducks. They pulled sleds over snow. When fires broke out in cities, firehouse dogs cleared the way for fire wagons pulled by horses.

These hard-working dogs were too dirty and smelly to live indoors. If they got sick or hurt, they healed on their own or they died. Most vets treated only animals that were seen as valuable at that time, like horses and cows.

Gabi Rona/CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images

In the ‘50s, the show Lassie helped turn dogs into all-American pets.

But by the late 1800s, that was starting to change. America was becoming wealthier. More people could afford to feed and care for a pet. New and powerful soaps scrubbed dogs clean and killed fleas. Companies started selling dog food, which made feeding a dog more convenient. Veterinarians opened offices just for treating dogs and other pets. In the 1950s, some of the most popular TV shows, like Lassie and The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin, helped turn dogs into all-American pets.

Of course, Americans have embraced other pets too. For instance, there are more cats in American homes than dogs. But humans have a uniquely powerful relationship with dogs, one that scientists are just beginning to figure out.

But by the late 1800s, that was changing. America was becoming wealthier. More people could afford to feed and care for a pet. New and powerful soaps scrubbed dogs clean and killed fleas. Companies started selling dog food, which made feeding a dog simpler. Vets opened offices just for treating pets. In the 1950s, TV shows like Lassie and The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin helped turn dogs into popular pets.

Americans love other pets too. There are more cats than dogs in American homes. But humans have a special connection with dogs. Scientists are just starting to figure out this connection.

Studies show that dogs really do improve our lives. Walking a dog several times a day improves the health of elderly people. Dogs can help kids with autism and other challenges cope with stress.

New research is helping to show the scientific basis for our connection to dogs. In 2015, Japanese researchers found that when humans and dogs gaze into each other’s eyes, something happens inside both species’ bodies. Both the human’s and the dog’s brains release a chemical that makes them feel close. This is the same chemical that helps mothers feel close to their babies.

Another study showed that when humans point to something, dogs look where we’re pointing. This shows that dogs try to understand us. Not even our closest animal relative—the chimpanzee—does that naturally.

Today, dogs help humans in many incredible ways. They lead people who can’t see. They find people who are lost. They comfort wounded soldiers.

But most dogs are like Scout, with just one main job: loving us. And for most of us, that’s enough.

Studies show that dogs make our lives better. Dog owners tend to get more exercise those daily walks make them healthier. Dogs can help kids with autism and other challenges cope with stress.

New research is helping to uncover the scientific reason for our connection to dogs. In 2015, Japanese researchers found that when humans and dogs look into each other’s eyes, something happens inside their bodies. Both the human’s and the dog’s brains release a chemical that makes them feel close. It’s the same chemical that helps mothers feel close to their babies.

Another study showed that when humans point to something, dogs look where we’re pointing. This shows that dogs try to understand us. Not even our closest animal relative, the chimpanzee, does that naturally.

Today, dogs help humans in many ways. They lead people who can’t see. They find people who are lost. They comfort wounded soldiers.

But most dogs, like Scout, have just one main job: to love us. And for most of us, that’s enough.

  • Imagine you could transform yourself into either a wolf or a dog. Which would you be? Write a paragraph explaining your choice and what time period you would like to live in. Find details in the articles, and use your imagination, to describe what your life would be like, what your daily activities might be, and what your relationship with humans would be like.
  • Watch the video "Into the World of Military Working Dogs." As you watch, make a list of all the ways dogs help soldiers. Then use your list to write a thank-you note to a military working dog for being such an important helper.
  • Imagine you could transform yourself into either a wolf or a dog. Which would you be? Write a paragraph explaining your choice and what time period you would like to live in. Find details in the articles, and use your imagination, to describe what your life would be like, what your daily activities might be, and what your relationship with humans would be like.
  • Watch the video "Into the World of Military Working Dogs." As you watch, make a list of all the ways dogs help soldiers. Then use your list to write a thank-you note to a military working dog for being such an important helper.
  • Imagine you could transform yourself into either a wolf or a dog. Which would you be? Write a paragraph explaining your choice and what time period you would like to live in. Find details in the articles, and use your imagination, to describe what your life would be like, what your daily activities might be, and what your relationship with humans would be like.
  • Watch the video "Into the World of Military Working Dogs." As you watch, make a list of all the ways dogs help soldiers. Then use your list to write a thank-you note to a military working dog for being such an important helper.
  • Imagine you could transform yourself into either a wolf or a dog. Which would you be? Write a paragraph explaining your choice and what time period you would like to live in. Find details in the articles, and use your imagination, to describe what your life would be like, what your daily activities might be, and what your relationship with humans would be like.
  • Watch the video "Into the World of Military Working Dogs." As you watch, make a list of all the ways dogs help soldiers. Then use your list to write a thank-you note to a military working dog for being such an important helper.

Synthesizing, vocabulary, text evidence, main idea, key details, tone, compare and contrast, cause and effect, text structure, explanatory writing

“How the Wolf Became the Dog” explains where dogs came from and the history of their relationship with humans. “How America Went DOG Crazy” is about how dogs became popular and beloved pets in the United States.

The first text is mainly chronological. Both texts include cause-and-effect and compare-and-contrast structures.

The articles include challenging academic and domain-specific vocabulary (e.g. ancestors, domesticated, morphed, predators), as well as figurative language like similes and rhetorical questions.

Some knowledge of dog characteristics and behavior will aid in comprehension. The articles also include historical references (George Washington, Lewis and Clark) and mention of old TV shows.

860L (on level), 650L (lower level)

Preview Text Features and Vocabulary (20 minutes)

  • Have students look at the photos and captions in both articles. Ask: What difference do you notice between the dogs featured in the first article and those in the second? (The dogs in the first article have important jobs: hunting, fighting, delivering medicine. The ones in the second article seem to be adored pets.)
  • Distribute the vocabulary activity to introduce challenging terms in the text. Highlighted terms: ancestors, mastodons, morphed, speculate, aggressive, domesticated
  • Call on a student to read aloud the Up Close box on page 16 for the class.

Read and Unpack the Text (45 minutes)

Read the articles as a class. Then put students in groups to answer the close-reading questions.

Discuss the critical-thinking question as a class.

“How the Wolf Became the Dog”

Close-Reading Questions

In the first section, the authors write that “life was a daily struggle for survival” during the Ice Age. What evidence do they give to support this statement? (text evidence) The authors explain that many early humans lived in shelters made of animal bones, hunted using simple tools, suffered from diseases with no cures, and faced threats from fierce animals like saber-toothed tigers.

According to “From Wolf to Dog,” what do scientists know for sure about the history of dogs? (main idea) Scientists know that all dogs have the same animal ancestor, the gray wolf, and that it took thousands of years for wolves to turn into the creatures we know as dogs.

What is one theory about how humans and wolves first teamed up? How did this help both species? (key details) One theory is that a group of less aggressive wolves began sneaking into human campsites to eat food scraps. This helped keep the humans safe from other dangerous predators, and helped the wolves live longer than most other wolves.

Based on “Hunters, Napkins,” what is a domesticated animal? What details in this section help you understand what makes dogs domesticated animals? (vocabulary/key details) A domesticated animal is one that has developed to live among humans, often to serve a useful purpose. The section shows that dogs are domesticated by noting that they are “eager to please humans” and that humans have used them to perform jobs like hunting, herding, and even foot-warming.

“How America Went DOG Crazy“

Close-Reading Questions

In the first section, what is the authors’ tone, or attitude, toward Scout? Why do you think they describe Scout in this way? (tone) The authors’ tone is annoyed and disapproving they describe Scout as “a spoiled, badly behaved little beast.” This description shows that his owners’ love for him is strong enough to make up for the annoyance.

Reread the section “Too Dirty and Smelly.” How is the way dogs are treated today different from the way they were treated in the past? (compare and contrast) Today, dogs are treated as important members of the family they’re pampered with treats and rushed to the veterinarian when they’re sick. But in the past, dogs were seen simply as workers. They were kept outside and not considered valuable enough to be taken for medical care.

Based on “From Workers to Pets,” how was America changing in the late 1800s? How did this affect our relationship with dogs? (cause and effect) In the late 1800s, America was becoming wealthier. More people could afford to feed and care for dogs, so dogs became more popular as pets.

Why might the authors have included the section “A Surprising Discovery”? (text structure) The authors likely included this section to help explain one of the article’s main ideas—that humans and dogs have “a uniquely powerful relationship.” Understanding the scientific basis for this relationship helps readers see why dogs are such popular pets.

Critical-Thinking Question

What is the biggest difference between why people own dogs today and why people owned dogs in the past? Use details from both articles in your answer. (synthesizing) Today, most people keep dogs as companions 96 percent of owners even consider their pet dogs to be members of the family. But in the past, people kept dogs mainly to perform jobs like hunting, herding, and fighting.


Keywords

There is no shortage of information available to the public regarding various forms of intermittent fasting and the purported health benefits of such practices in fact, an October 2016 internet search using the terms “diet fasting intermittent alternate day” had more than 210,000 hits. In contrast, there is a shortage of evidence-based support for intermittent fasting that can be used to generate recommendations for public health practice. Intermittent fasting—that is, periods of voluntary abstinence from food and drink—is an ancient practice followed in a variety of different formats by populations globally (12). The popular press includes numerous publications, blogs, news articles, and diet recommendations related to intermittent fasting and intermittent caloric restriction. For example, in 2013, Mosley & Spencer (75) published a best-selling book titled “The FastDiet,” which touts the benefits of restricting energy intake severely for 2 days a week but eating normally during the rest of the week. A major online retailer lists more than 1,500 items related to intermittent fasting, including diet books, recipe collections, apps, and food supplements. There is a high level of interest in intermittent fasting and metabolic health in the scientific community, as well as among the lay public and media. The number of review articles on the general topic nearly matches the number of primary human and animal model research studies published during 2014–2016 (3–6, 8, 9, 19–23, 29, 40, 44, 48, 51, 53, 56, 58, 59, 63, 66–68, 72, 76, 84, 91, 92, 103, 104, 108, 116, 121). Together, striking evidence from animal studies and suggestive evidence from human studies strongly support the need for rigorous clinical investigation of using intermittent fasting regimens to improve health.

This review provides an overview of intermittent fasting regimens (Table 1), summarizes the evidence for the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discusses physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. We focus on human intervention studies, but also present compelling evidence from rodent models and reviews. The bulk of scientific evidence for the health benefits of intermittent fasting primarily comes from studies of male rodent models. Human studies have largely been limited to observational studies of religious fasting (e.g., during Ramadan), cross-sectional studies of eating patterns associated with health outcomes, and experimental studies with modest sample sizes. For the purposes of this review, the health outcomes of interest are changes in weight and in metabolic parameters associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. We also present an overview of the major physiological mechanisms hypothesized to link fasting regimens with human health: (a) circadian biology, (b) the gut microbiome, and (c) modifiable lifestyle behaviors, such as diet, activity, and sleep. In conclusion, we present summary points regarding the evidence base for intermittent fasting as an intervention for improving human health and propose future issues that should be addressed in rigorously designed clinical trials.

Intermittent fasting regimens hypothesized to impact health outcomes


How Donald Trump came up with ‘Make America Great Again’


President-elect Donald Trump poses for a portrait at Trump Tower on Jan. 17. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)

The four words that would help propel Donald Trump to the White House were an inspiration born years before, when hardly anyone but Trump himself could imagine him taking the oath of office as the 45th president of the United States.

It happened on Nov. 7, 2012, the day after Mitt Romney lost what had been presumed to be a winnable race against President Obama. Republicans were spiraling into an identity crisis, one that had some wondering whether a GOP president would ever sit in the Oval Office again.

But on the 26th floor of a golden Manhattan tower that bears his name, Trump was coming to the conclusion that his own moment was at hand.

And in typical fashion, the first thing he thought about was how to brand it.

One after another, phrases popped into his head. “We Will Make America Great.” That one did not have the right ring. Then, “Make America Great.” But that sounded like a slight to the country.

And then, it hit him: “Make America Great Again.”

“I said, ‘That is so good.’ I wrote it down,” Trump recalled in an interview. “I went to my lawyers. I have a lot of lawyers in-house. We have many lawyers. I have got guys that handle this stuff. I said, ‘See if you can have this registered and trademarked.’ ”

Five days later, Trump signed an application with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, in which he asked for exclusive rights to use “Make America Great Again” for “political action committee services, namely, promoting public awareness of political issues and fundraising in the field of politics.” He enclosed a $325 registration fee.

His was a vision that ran against the conventional wisdom of the time — in fact, it was “much the opposite,” Trump said.

To save itself, the Republican establishment was convinced, the GOP would have to sand off its edges, become kinder and more inclusive. “Make America Great Again” was divisive and backward-looking. It made no nod to diversity or civility or progress.

It sounded like a death wish.

But Trump had seen something different in the country, and in the daily lives of its struggling citizens.

“I felt that jobs were hurting,” he said. “I looked at the many types of illness our country had, and whether it’s at the border, whether it’s security, whether it’s law and order or lack of law and order. Then, of course, you get to trade, and I said to myself, ‘What would be good?’ I was sitting at my desk, where I am right now, and I said, ‘Make America Great Again.’ ”

“If you’re looking for someone to say what is wrong with America, I’m not your candidate. I think there is more right than wrong,” Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton said. “I don’t think we have to make America great. I think we have to make America greater.”

Her husband, former president Bill Clinton, went so far as to declare it a racist dog whistle.

“I’m actually old enough to remember the good old days, and they weren’t all that good in many ways,” he said at a rally in Orlando. “That message where ‘I’ll give you America great again’ is if you’re a white Southerner, you know exactly what it means, don’t you?”

The slogan itself was not entirely original. Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush had used “Let’s Make America Great Again” in their 1980 campaign — a fact that Trump maintained he did not know until about a year ago.

“But he didn’t trademark it,” Trump said of Reagan.

His decision to claim legal ownership reflected a businessman’s mind-set. “I think I’m somebody that understands marketing,” Trump said.

Trump Organization lawyer Alan Garten said Trump holds upward of 800 trademarks in more than 80 countries.

The trademark became effective on July 14, 2015, a month after Trump formally announced his campaign and met the legal requirement that he was actually using it for the purposes spelled out in his application.

Having won the trademark, Trump was aggressive in protecting his idea. When his GOP primary rivals Sen. Ted Cruz (Tex.) and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker began tucking “make America great again” into their own speeches, Trump’s lawyers fired off cease-and-desist letters.


Trump’s red trucker cap featuring the Make America Great Again slogan was ubiquitious during the campaign. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

Trump was an impulsive and erratic candidate who ran a chaotic campaign. The one constant, it often seemed, was “Make America Great Again.”

“I didn’t know it was going to catch on like it did. It’s been amazing,” Trump said. “The hat, I guess, is the biggest symbol, wouldn’t you say?”

There were plenty of snickers when his Federal Election Commission filings showed that his campaign was spending more on “Make America Great Again” trucker caps than on polling, political consultants, staff or television ads.

“An appropriate icon for his failing campaign,” the Washington Examiner’s Philip Wegmann wrote in late October. “The millions of hats will make excellent keepsakes for those who thought his populist bravado could overcome Clinton’s unimaginative and conventional but well-oiled political machine.”

Trump saw the hats as a fundraising and advertising vehicle. He was thrilled when his campaign headgear landed in the New York Times Style section — during Fashion Week, no less.

“In the Style section, it was the ornament — what do you call that? — an accessory. They said the accessory of the year. You know the hat. You’d see people going to the fanciest balls at the Waldorf Astoria wearing red hats,” he exulted.

As is often the case, Trump’s description is more than a little hyperbolic. What the newspaper actually wrote was that the “old-school” caps had become “the ironic must-have fashion accessory of the summer,” favored by hipsters for their “uncanny ability to capture the current absurdist political moment.”

None of which fazed the celebrity billionaire who had debuted the hats by wearing one during a July 2015 trip to the Mexican border — or the legions of supporters who raced to snap them up. Trump had designed them himself, he said. The basic models sold through his campaign website were priced at $25.

“How many did we sell? Does anyone know? Millions!” Trump said in the interview.

“It was copied, unfortunately. It was knocked off by 10 to one. It was knocked off by others. But it was a slogan, and every time somebody buys one, that’s an advertisement.”

However many hats he sold, what cannot be disputed is that “Make America Great Again” caught on. It was the most effective kind of political message, bite-sized and visceral.

“It actually inspired me,” Trump said, “because to me, it meant jobs. It meant industry, and meant military strength. It meant taking care of our veterans. It meant so much.”

That kind of mission statement was something that Clinton’s campaign — for all its poll testing and high-priced advice from Madison Avenue — struggled to articulate.

Her strategists considered 85 possibilities for a general-election campaign slogan before settling on “Stronger Together,” according to an email from the account of campaign chairman John Podesta that was published by WikiLeaks.

What they were up against was nothing short of “a marketing genius,” said David Axelrod, who had been Obama’s chief political strategist. Trump “understood the market that he was trying to reach. You can’t deny him that. He was very focused from the start on who he was talking to.”

While Clinton carried the popular vote, Trump lined up the states he needed to win what mattered: the electoral college.

“In terms of galvanizing the market that he was talking to,” Axelrod said, “he did it single-mindedly and ingeniously.”

Halfway through his interview with The Washington Post, Trump shared a bit of news: He already has decided on his slogan for a reelection bid in 2020.

“Are you ready?” he said. “ ‘Keep America Great,’ exclamation point.”

“Get me my lawyer!” the president-elect shouted.

Two minutes later, one arrived.

“Will you trademark and register, if you would, if you like it — I think I like it, right? Do this: ‘Keep America Great,’ with an exclamation point. With and without an exclamation. ‘Keep America Great,’ ” Trump said.

“Got it,” the lawyer replied.

That bit of business out of the way, Trump returned to the interview.

“I never thought I’d be giving [you] my expression for four years [from now],” he said. “But I am so confident that we are going to be, it is going to be so amazing. It’s the only reason I give it to you. If I was, like, ambiguous about it, if I wasn’t sure about what is going to happen — the country is going to be great.”

All of which raises the questions: How can greatness be measured and sensed? What does it even mean?

“Being a great president has to do with a lot of things, but one of them is being a great cheerleader for the country,” Trump said. “And we’re going to show the people as we build up our military, we’re going to display our military.

“That military may come marching down Pennsylvania Avenue. That military may be flying over New York City and Washington, D.C., for parades. I mean, we’re going to be showing our military,” he added.

But Trump acknowledged that slogans and showmanship will not be the ultimate tests of whether the country is “great again.”

The president-elect has an ambitious to-do list for the next four years: building stronger borders, keeping the country safe against terrorism, producing more jobs, repealing the Affordable Care Act, replacing it with something better, promoting excellence in engineering and science, investing in modern infrastructure.

Ultimately, it will be up to the people for whom “Make America Great Again” was a covenant, not a slogan, to decide whether the 45th president has lived up to his promise.

“I think they have to feel it,” Trump acknowledged. “Being a cheerleader or a salesman for the country is very important, but you still have to produce the results.”

“Honestly, you haven’t seen anything yet. Wait till you see what happens, starting next Monday,” he said. “A lot of things are going to happen. Great things.”


May 17, 2017 Day118 of the First Year - History

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership. They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests.

The SDGs build on decades of work by countries and the UN, including the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs

  • In June 1992, at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, more than 178 countries adopted Agenda 21, a comprehensive plan of action to build a global partnership for sustainable development to improve human lives and protect the environment.
  • Member States unanimously adopted the Millennium Declaration at the Millennium Summit in September 2000 at UN Headquarters in New York. The Summit led to the elaboration of eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to reduce extreme poverty by 2015.
  • The Johannesburg Declaration on Sustainable Development and the Plan of Implementation, adopted at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in South Africa in 2002, reaffirmed the global community's commitments to poverty eradication and the environment, and built on Agenda 21 and the Millennium Declaration by including more emphasis on multilateral partnerships.
  • At the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in June 2012, Member States adopted the outcome document "The Future We Want" in which they decided, inter alia, to launch a process to develop a set of SDGs to build upon the MDGs and to establish the UN High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development. The Rio +20 outcome also contained other measures for implementing sustainable development, including mandates for future programmes of work in development financing, small island developing states and more.
  • In 2013, the General Assembly set up a 30-member Open Working Group to develop a proposal on the SDGs.
  • In January 2015, the General Assembly began the negotiation process on the post-2015 development agenda. The process culminated in the subsequent adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with 17 SDGs at its core, at the UN Sustainable Development Summit in September 2015.
  • 2015 was a landmark year for multilateralism and international policy shaping, with the adoption of several major agreements:
      (March 2015) (July 2015) with its 17 SDGs was adopted at the UN Sustainable Development Summit in New York in September 2015. (December 2015)
  • Today, the Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) in the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) provides substantive support and capacity-building for the SDGs and their related thematic issues, including water, energy, climate, oceans, urbanization, transport, science and technology, the Global Sustainable Development Report (GSDR), partnerships and Small Island Developing States. DSDG plays a key role in the evaluation of UN systemwide implementation of the 2030 Agenda and on advocacy and outreach activities relating to the SDGs. In order to make the 2030 Agenda a reality, broad ownership of the SDGs must translate into a strong commitment by all stakeholders to implement the global goals. DSDG aims to help facilitate this engagement.

    Follow DSDG on Facebook at www.facebook.com/sustdev and on Twitter at @SustDev.


    4. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria

    Hurricane season in 2017 was particularly brutal for the southeastern U.S. and Caribbean. Hurricane Harvey left a path of destruction in Houston and surrounding areas of Texas as well as Louisiana. Record-breaking downpours left entire towns underwater, including small farm communities like Winnie, Texas .

    The nation barely had time to rally around the victims before Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida, also causing severe damage in Puerto Rico on the way.

    Then when Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico at the end of September, power was knocked out to the entire U.S. territory and millions of residents -- who are U.S. citizens -- struggled to find clean drinking water and safe shelter. With communications down and major roadways destroyed, aid couldn't reach large portions of the population .

    People are understandably furious about the power outage at @ATLairport - but know this:

    Sunday in Puerto Rico
    88 days after Maria
    Status.pr reports:
    *69% power generation
    (Thousands of Americans have been without power for nearly 3 months it may be May before everyone has it)

    &mdash David Begnaud (@DavidBegnaud) December 17, 2017

    Three months later, 30 percent of the island is still without electricity and nearly 250,000 people have sought refuge in Florida, CBS News' David Begnaud reports.


    President Obama Has Now Granted More Commutations than Any President in this Nation’s History

    Today, 273 individuals learned that the President has given them a second chance. With today’s 209 grants of commutation, the President has now commuted the sentences of 1,385 individuals – the most grants of commutation issued by any President in this nation’s history. President Obama’s 1,385 commutation grants – which includes 504 life sentences – is also more than the total number of commutations issued by the past 12 presidents combined. And with today’s 64 pardons, the President has now granted a total of 212 pardons.

    Today, 209 commutation recipients – including 109 individuals who had believed they would live out their remaining days in prison – learned that they will be rejoining their families and loved ones, and 64 pardon recipients learned that their past convictions have been forgiven. These 273 individuals learned that our nation is a forgiving nation, where hard work and a commitment to rehabilitation can lead to a second chance, and where wrongs from the past will not deprive an individual of the opportunity to move forward. Today, 273 individuals – like President Obama’s 1,324 clemency recipients before them – learned that our President has found them deserving of a second chance.

    While the mercy the President has shown his 1,597 clemency recipients is remarkable, we must remember that clemency is an extraordinary remedy, granted only after the President has concluded that a particular individual has demonstrated a readiness to make use of his or her second chance. Only Congress can achieve the broader reforms needed to ensure over the long run that our criminal justice system operates more fairly and effectively in the service of public safety.


    Standard history

    In March 2004 the International Accounting Standards Board (Board) issued IFRS 4 Insurance Contracts. IFRS 4 was an interim standard which was meant to be in place until the Board completed its project on insurance contracts. IFRS 4 permitted entities to use a wide variety of accounting practices for insurance contracts, reflecting national accounting requirements and variations of those requirements, subject to limited improvements and specified disclosures.

    In May 2017, the Board completed its project on insurance contracts with the issuance of IFRS 17 Insurance Contracts. IFRS 17 replaces IFRS 4 and sets out principles for the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of insurance contracts within the scope of IFRS 17.

    In June 2020, the Board issued Amendments to IFRS 17. The objective of the amendments is to assist entities implementing the Standard, while not unduly disrupting implementation or diminishing the usefulness of the information provided by applying IFRS 17.

    Other Standards have made minor consequential amendments to IFRS 17, including Amendments to References to the Conceptual Framework in IFRS Standards (issued March 2018) and Definition of Material (Amendments to IAS 1 and IAS 8) (issued October 2018).


    The Earth’s temperature has risen since record-keeping began in the 19th century. Warming began to accelerate around the 1980s.

    Distance from 1951-1980 average

    Human-induced climate change has made it at least 160 times more likely that three consecutive years after 2000 would be record-setting, according to Michael E. Mann, a climate scientist at Pennsylvania State University.

    His findings show that if human-induced climate change was not part of the equation, the amount of warming in 2016 would have less than one-in-a-million odds of occurring.

    “One could argue that about 75 percent of the warmth was due to human impact,” Dr. Mann said.


    The 1927 Bombing That Remains America’s Deadliest School Massacre

    Columbine. Virginia Tech. University of Texas. Sandy Hook. America’s terrible history of school shootings is a list whose members can’t be named alone. Talk about any single one, and the others always hover on the periphery. But one name rarely gets mentioned among the others, the oldest and deadliest school massacre in U.S. history: the Bath School bombing.

    In 1927, Bath was a rural village of 300 people despite its location ten miles from Lansing, the state capital. The local institute of learning was Bath Consolidated School, built only five years earlier to replace the scattered one-room schools of the surrounding farmland. It had 314 students from around the region, many the sons and daughters of farmers. Some students were bused in, and all took classes with their peers over the course of elementary and high school.

    May 18 was the last day of classes for students that year, but at 8:45 the north wing of the three-story structure exploded with such force that the boom was heard miles away.

    “We knew it came from Bath, but we didn’t know what it was or anything, so we jumped in the old car and drove as fast as we could to see what it was,” Irene Dunham told the Lansing State Journal. The centenarian is the oldest living survivor. She was 19 at the time, a senior about to finish her last year—and stayed home that morning due to a sore throat.

    “There was a pile of children about five or six under the roof and some of them had arms sticking out, some had legs, and some just their heads sticking out. They were unrecognizable because they were covered with dust, plaster and blood,” wrote local author Monty J. Ellsworth in his 1927 account, The Bath School Disaster. “It is a miracle that many parents didn’t lose their minds before the task of getting their children out of the ruins was completed. It was between five and six o’clock that evening before the last child was taken out.”

    As community members rushed to help after the explosion, getting rope to lift up the collapsed roof and pull the students and teachers from the rubble, a member of the school board named Andrew Kehoe drove up to the site. Kehoe stepped out of his truck filled with dynamite and shrapnel, aimed his rifle at it, and fired. The ensuing explosion killed the school superintendent, several other bystanders, and Kehoe himself.

    In addition to the hundreds of pounds of explosives that had set off the blast at the school, fire department personnel and police officers found another 500 pounds of unexploded pyrotol dynamite rigged up around the school’s basement, along with a container of gasoline that may have been placed there to cause a fire if the dynamite failed. Kehoe had also burned his farmhouse and killed his wife and two horses their bodies were discovered at the farm, along with a sign attached to the property fence that read, “Criminals are made, not born.” 

    The bombing happened on May 18, 1927 and resulted in the deaths of 44 people, including 38 students. (Courtesy of Arnie Bernstein) The new memorial park, in which stands the cupola that was once at the top of the school. (Courtesy of Arnie Bernstein ) A car that was near the school, destroyed by the bombing. (Courtesy of Arnie Bernstein) The remains of Andrew Kehoe's house, where he killed his wife, Nellie. (Courtesy of Arnie Bernstein)

    Prior to the massacre, Kehoe had been just another community member. He lived with his wife, Nellie, on a farm, and held the position of treasurer on the Bath school board. The one-time electrician had a large supply of explosives—World War I surplus—bought from the government that he used to help farmers remove tree stumps. There’d been several unusual incidents prior to the bombing: Kehoe killed his neighbor’s dog, beat one of his horses to death, and argued with members of the school board over the cost of ongoing taxes for the consolidated school. But it had never been anything so alarming that other villagers had any suspicion of what was coming.

    “A lot of the stupid things he did were just stupid things people did,” says Arnie Bernstein, the author of Bath Massacre: America’s First School Bombing.

    In the end 44 people died, 38 of them students. It wasn’t the first bombing in the country’s history—at least eight were killed during the Haymarket Square rally in Chicago in 1886, and 30 when a bomb exploded in Manhattan in 1920. But none had been so deadly as this, or affected so many children.

    Newspapers rushed to make sense of the tragedy. They called Kehoe insane, demented, a madman. Although there was little understanding of mental illness at that point, the media still tried to find reasons for the bombing. “He was notified last June that the mortgage on his farm would be foreclosed, and that may have been the circumstance that started the clockwork of anarchy and madness in his brain,” claimed the New York Times, while the Boston Daily Globe suggested that two head injuries may have disrupted his thinking.

    “At the conclusion of the inquest, it says he was of rational mind the whole time,” Bernstein says. “It does take a rational mind to plan all that out. The reality is there’s no why.”

    In the immediate aftermath of the bombing, the community was inundated with well wishes and donations—as well as rubbernecking tourists. As funerals were held in homes around Bath over the weekend, as many as 50,000 people drove through the town, causing massive traffic jams. But almost as quickly as the media frenzy built up, it abruptly ceased—in part because of Charles Lindbergh’s successful first-ever nonstop transatlantic flight two days after the bombing. Combined with the lack of true mass media, the Bath bombing quickly fell out of the news cycle.

    “In a way that’s probably the best thing that could happen for the town, because it gave them time to mourn and heal,” Bernstein says.

    Within a year, the school had been repaired, and classes moved from local stores back to the schoolhouse. The school remained in place until the 1970s, when it was torn down and replaced by a memorial park. In the center of the park stands the school’s cupola, exactly where it would have been on the school. For Bernstein, it’s a place of quiet and peacefulness, a fitting tribute to the students and community members who died.

    “In the face of horror we discover how decent we are,” Bernstein says. “That, to me, is the beauty of Bath.”


    Watch the video: History on Tape - Interview with Sebastian Conrad